NHS Designs

Definition
prox·im·i·ty
noun
closeness; the state of being near

Design Principles
Proximity

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Page 1: Introduction

Items relating to each other should be grouped close together. When several items are in close proximity to each other, they become one visual unit rather than several separate units. This helps organize information, reduces clutter, and gives the reader a clear structure.

Very often in the work of new designers, the words and phrases and graphics are strung out all over the place, filling comers and taking up lots of room so there won't be any empty space. There seems to be a fear of empty space.

When pieces of a design are scattered all over, the page appears unorganized and the information may not be instantly accessible to the reader.

The Principle of Proximity states that you group related items together, move them physically close to each other so the related items are seen as one cohesive group rather than a bunch of unrelated bits.

Items or groups of information that are not related to each other should not be in close proximity (nearness) to the other elements, which gives the reader an instant visual clue to the organization and content of the page.

 

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Source: The Non-Designer's Design Book by Robin Williams


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